COMMUNITY

 
   

To Captain N. H. Brower: "Shamus O'Brien" (1870)

Answer to "Nora O'Neal" [by W.S. Hays, 1866]

A Beautiful Song and Chorus by William Shakespeare Hays, 1837-1907

1.  Oh! sweet is the smile of the beautiful morn, As it peeps thro' the curtain of night. And the voice of the nightingale singing his tune, While the stars seem to smile with delight. Old nature now lingers in silent repose, And the sweet breath of summer is calm, While I sit and wander if Shamus e'er knows, How sad and unhappy I am.

 (CHORUS)

Oh! Shamus O'Brien, why don't you come home? You don't know how happy I'll be; I've but one darling wish, and that is that you'd come, And forever be happy with me.

2.  I'll smile when you smile and I'll weep when you weep, I'll give you a kiss for a kiss; And all the fond vows I've made you I'll keep; What more can I promise than this? Does the sea have such bright and such beautiful charms, That your heart will not leave it for me? Oh! why did I let you get out of my arms, Like a bird that was caged and is free.

(CHORUS)

Oh! Shamus O'Brien, why don't you come home? You don't know how happy I'll be; I've but one darling wish, and that is that you'd come, And forever be happy with me.

3. Oh! Shamus O'Brien I'm loving you yet, And my heart is still trusting and kind; It was you who first took it, and can you forget? That love for another you'd find? No! No! If you break it with sorrow and pain, I'll then have a duty to do; If you'll bring it to me, I'll mend it again, And trust it, dear Shamus to you.

(CHORUS)

Oh! Shamus O'Brien, why don't you come home? You don't know how happy I'll be; I've but one darling wish, and that is that you'd come, And forever be happy with me.